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Spotlight on: Leeward Bean, CEO of Big Frog Custom T-Shirts

video client spotlight

Pinstripe project manager Nikki Devereux met Leeward in the beginning of 2017. They instantly clicked, and chatted over coffee for more than two hours about a video project for Leeward’s franchise brand, Big Frog Custom T-Shirts and More. Leeward’s description of the Big Frog brand and family was so enticing that Nikki instantly wanted to be a part of it in any way possible! In the end, her role was to film the 2017 Frogathon, and she had a great experience doing so. Frogathan is a 4-day event where all the Big Frog franchisees come together in St. Petersburg, FL for education, mingling, food, drink, and fun.

“The Big Frog team made me feel like a part of their family, and every person I met was kind, happy, and energetic. Big Frog brings that out of you and that’s what was so compelling when I first met Leeward – he was all about the franchisees, taking care of them, making sure they were successful, making sure they were HAPPY. I wanted to be a part of that,” Nikki said after filming the event. Stay tuned for the video, coming soon in the portfolio!

Name: Leeward Bean

Title: Chief Executive Frog

Company: Big Frog Custom T-Shirts

City: Dunedin, FL

Web site: www.bigfrog.com

 

What inspired you to found Big Frog Custom T-Shirts?

A young couple who worked with me at another company wanted to start their own business.

What do you like most about the your industry and community?

Helping people start their own businesses and making people smile when they get their new favorite T-shirt.

What challenges does your industry face?

Managing and directing 90 independently owned and operated business.

How do you measure your success?

How well our franchisees do.

What has been your greatest accomplishment in your career?

When we sold our last company, eleven people became millionaires.

What do you think is the biggest mistake companies make when working in your industry?

Not focusing on the franchisees.

What is the most interesting trend you see in your industry?

The ability to produce one T-shirt at a time cost effectively.

How has technology helped your work?

The extremely high resolution and reliability of the direct-to-garment printers.

How do you stay on top of your field?

Always putting the customer first and under promising and over delivering.

What resources do you recommend? (Books, magazines, web, etc.)

My favorite book is ‘Why’ by Simon Sinek.

If you could give one piece of advice to Tampa Bay companies, what would it be?

Get up every morning with a positive mental attitude and listen to what people have to say; especially your customers.

What was your first job?

Selling eggs door to door when I was six years old.

What are your hobbies?

Fishing!

Favorite food?

Cuban sandwiches

Last book you read?

Total Control by David Baldacci

Pinstripe and Southern Roots Realty Win Silver Davey Award

Tampa Bay web designPinstripe Marketing and Southern Roots Realty – proud recipients of a silver Davey Award for the Southern Roots website. What is a Davey Award? We asked the same question about a year ago, and the path leading to us receiving one is a prime example of good marketing (both on our part and the Davey Awards).

We receive a lot of mail. Much of it is promotional mail of various types, and the Davey Awards piece we received was no exception.

Except it was.

I opened the envelope, which has since been discarded, but must have been compelling in and of itself to prompt me to open it. Inside I found this Davey Awards poster. pinstripe davey awards website design I loved the design! I couldn’t throw it away. It wasn’t just a promotional piece – it was a work of art, and just so happened to look nice on my wall. There it stayed for several months until one day I really looked at it and noticed the deadline to enter was approaching. Come to think of it, I hadn’t really bothered to visit the website, I just liked the poster enough to hang it on the wall – indefinitely. So, that morning I decided to go to the website.

Upon entering the site, I realized that the Davey Awards suited Pinstripe Marketing perfectly.

“Small agencies. Big ideas.” That’s us.

Meanwhile, we had also just put the finishing touches on the Southern Roots website – and it was beautiful. I browsed the award entries until I found the right category for Southern Roots, took a look at some past winners and decided that we had a fighting chance. So we entered. A few months later, I received notification in the mail – we won the silver! It’s such a great feeling to receive outside recognition for something you’ve worked hard on. To be sure, the Southern Roots team loved their site and showered us with endless praise, but to have a panel of judges tell us that we deserve recognition as well, that was a good feeling. Also, it’s plain old good marketing. Sometimes you have to seek outside recognition for your work, and once you do, you are sharing that work with many people who may not have seen it otherwise (plus the bonus bragging rights if you win).

And on the part of the Davey Awards marketing team – kudos for coming up with an idea that hooked me, even though it took six months for me to realize it. If they had sent a regular postcard, I probably would have thrown it away, especially if I didn’t have a project to enter at the moment. But, because the poster had the longer shelf life of a work of art, something I really connected with, an entry materialized over the several months that the poster hung, and it all came together eventually. We try to keep this in mind with our marketing materials as well. Good design connects with people, people connect with it. Find that connection, and you’ve found a pot of gold.

residential real estate web site wolfnet integrationHere’s to a job well done by all involved, from the Pinstripe Marketing creative team, the Southern Roots team, and the Davey Awards team. Each of these people played a role in this award. We all decided to do a photo shoot with our trophy and then celebrate afterwards, (minus the Davey Awards team because they are in New York and we thought it was too short notice to fly them down for the shoot). Here’s to a job well done for all of us who worked on this site!

~ Nikki

If you are craving good design, let’s chat!

 

Photo: Judson Kidd, Sarah Calabrese, and Natalie DeVicente from Southern Roots

Evie Larson, Nikki Devereux and Lyndsey Shaw from Pinstripe Marketing

Not pictured: Chris Jenkins, ImTheirWebGuy, developer

Maybe You Should Write a Blog

St. Petersburg online reputation managementAre you publishing your own business-related blog?  Maybe you’ve looked at the endless array of verbiage already on the web and wondered why you should add more. We get that, but we’re going to try to talk you into it anyway.

Your blog is about your business, not the millions of others on the Internet. You don’t stop talking just because billions of other people are already flapping their gums, do you? You’ve got something to say, and a blog could be an effective way to be heard by a receptive audience.

A blog shouldn’t be that hard for you to write. Blogs can be short; 250 – 500 words is perfect. You shouldn’t have to do (much) research because you are the expert! Keep the focus narrow then write as though you’re explaining something to a client or new employee.  If you aren’t confident of your grammar, spelling or construction, let someone with those skills clean it up for you. (Your friends at Pinstripe can help!) The goal is to convey interesting information in a way that’s easily digestible. You don’t have to wow anyone with your literary style.

A blog enhances your relationship with customers. This is a simple way to turn your expertise into a resource that’s easily accessible by your clients. Your willingness to make this effort, along with your display of knowledge, builds trust. Writing about things to which customers can relate helps you connect on a personal/human level.

A blog helps improve how your website is ranked by search engines. Google and other search engines like to see that a website isn’t just sitting stagnant on the web. Regular updating indicates the website is dynamic and has worthwhile content. Adding a blog or two a week is a good way to accomplish this.

Blogs work well with other social media. Having a new blog gives you something to tweet about, or to mention on Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+. Then the more the article gets retweeted, liked or shared, the more traffic is generated for your website … with stronger PR for your company.

A blog can re-enforce marketing campaigns. Your promotions will be directing customers to make a purchase, but a blog can come in handy for delivering a more subtle, thoughtful message that complements the advertising. Share an anecdote or interesting statistics that help highlight the value of your offerings in a way that makes prospective customers think and understand as they work toward a buying decision.

A blog can help explain “who you are.” Many companies have mission statements, but lofty words are often vague. A blog lets you continually sharpen and define that message so that everyone associated with your business—whether it’s clients, employees, suppliers or investors — grasps the issues you believe are important.

Do we have you convinced to give it a try? If so, you might like to check out “The Anatomy of a Perfect Blog Post: The Data on Headlines, Length, Images and More” as a helpful, how-to article.

Use a Welcome Letter to Help Hang on to a New Client

welcome client letterIf you’ve ever been fishing on the bank of a river or pond, you’ve probably had a fish that you caught spit the hook out just as it hits the ground. It’s flopping and flailing just inches from the water’s edge, and you must act quickly to prevent it from getting away. The fish has been landed, but not secured for the long term.

New clients can seem like that. They may not be comfortable in their new situation with you, and may want to get away. Unlike the fish, however, your client isn’t a victim of deception, and will benefit from being “reeled in.” A welcome letter (or more likely an email) is an easy way to keep new clients by reassuring them that they’re now in good hands.

Here is a six-point checklist for your new-client welcome letter:

Know who you’re writing to. Address the letter recipient by name in the salutation—first and last. This is going to sound a little hard-edged, but using someone’s full name indicates you know who they are and you have them “on record” as your client. It’s okay though, you are going to be warm, friendly and reassuring throughout the letter; potential intimidation will be purely subliminal. (Okay, maybe write, “Welcome, John Smith,” instead of “Dear John Smith.”)

Along with identifying your new client as an individual, you are also acknowledging their change of status—they’ve gone from being a prospect to a member of your clientele. So, give the active selling a rest! A welcome letter is not the place to upsell a new client or tell them about a sale or new offerings. Your purpose here is to make them comfortable in their new relationship with your business, that’s all.

Cement your relationship by referencing their affirmative action. They’ve either purchased something, agreed to purchase something, or have signed up to have you provide a product or service if their need arises. Mentioning their agreement to buy—like using their name—is a way of saying “we’ve got you down for this,” but quickly ask them how they are enjoying their purchase, or emphasize the benefits they can expect.

Reiterate your value proposition. When someone makes a purchase, they are acknowledging, and then attempting to satisfy a need (or desire). But just because someone came to you this time, doesn’t automatically mean you’ll get him/her the next time. Somewhere in your welcome letter, you should remind your new client of your company’s value proposition (e.g. the thing that best distinguishes you from your competitors).

Emphasize your brand. Your welcome letter isn’t an ad; in fact, it may come to your new client as plain text. But along with referencing your value proposition, there are other ways to help make your brand resonate with the client. Use your business name at least twice in the copy. Look for an opportunity to mention your tagline. Make sure the tone of your copy matches your other marketing materials (i.e. serious, professional, light-hearted, humorous … etc.). And of course, if there are graphic elements, they should match the color schemes and design of other public-facing collateral. In addition to building top-of-mind awareness, branding gives your clients something to which they can personally connect.

Include contact information. Communication is vital to every successful relationship … and that means two-way communication! Be sure to include a phone number, email address, URL … etc. for questions or feedback, then encourage their use.

And be a real human being! You used their full name, so put the name and title of a prominent representative of your company at the close of your welcome letter.  New clients will know that there’s a live person who is standing by the words of the letter and is offering to listen if they have something to say.

Thank them! We almost left this off the list because it seems so obvious, but let the new client know how much you appreciate the trust they’ve put in your company.

Keep in mind is that no one likes to be fooled (e.g. taken in by a shiny lure). That concern will work in your favor, because new clients want to be believe they made the right to decision about your business. When you send them a welcome letter, it’s kind like giving them a pat on the back that says, “Congratulations! You did good!”

Should Your Business Have a Newsletter?

enews_news
“We need a newsletter.” Perhaps no four words so fill the hearts of marketing communication staffs with dread. That’s because company newsletters always seem to be the spur-of-the-moment brainchild of underutilized executives, who — having left this rotting corpse of an idea on someone else’s doorstep — immediately scurry off to attend their regular duties (probably clogging sinks and putting sugar in gas tanks).

 

Okay, maybe that intro is a little over-the-top and not quite fair (after all, this article is in a newsletter) but we’re trying to flip the mindset on newsletters from automatic “yes” to skeptical “maybe.” They can indeed be worthwhile vehicles for building rapport with customers, channel partners, employees and others, but they can also easily become a burdensome waste of time that ends in embarrassing surrender

 

Here are five questions that must be answered with a solid affirmative before committing to producing a regular newsletter. (And it IS a commitment to your audience, even though 80% or more of them may never read it.)

  • Will it provide ongoing support for achieving your overall marketing objectives? You should think of a newsletter the way publishers think of any periodical: they expect them to run forever. This means you don’t want to create a new newsletter only in conjunction with an occasional or unique occurrence (i.e. new product or service) or business change (i.e. a merger) that takes place within a limited time. Sure, you should publicize such things in email alerts, press releases, ads, blogs, even articles in an existing newsletter … anything … except a separate publication. Newsletters need a permanent theme and then should help you do something that will always need to be done, namely keep vital audiences connected to your organization.
  • Will it always offer value to your audience? If you ask yourself whether someone would be better off by having read your proposed newsletter, you can probably always rationalize a “yes.” (After all, you wouldn’t want anyone to miss out on your weekly sales specials!) But will the audience readily perceive the value of your proposed newsletter’s content? Before you get too far along, ask some objective (and honest) people how they would feel about receiving the newsletter in their inboxes.
  • Will you have enough content? True, there are no rules about how long a newsletter has to be, but realistically, the first one will kind of set the standard. Before starting a newsletter, businesses often have a lot of share-worthy information stockpiled. However, if they get too ambitious with the frequency or amount of content up front, it will evaporate surprisingly fast. Editorial staff will be left scratching their heads as deadlines loom. Make sure you will always have an adequate amount of worthwhile information in the pipeline before going forward with a newsletter.
  • Do you have the resources to produce it? Don’t be fooled, a newsletter requires a real investment. Do you have people with the skill and talent to produce a newsletter? If yes, the second question is whether those people have the time. Then, will you be able to reliably get it to your readership? Finally, what sort of ROI can you expect? If you’re going to publish a newsletter, it should be done well … as it will be a very visible representation of your company. Poor quality and haphazard delivery will not speak well of your business.
  • Will you, personally, enthusiastically read it? If everything is a “yes” up to this point, you have some real momentum going in favor of a newsletter, but before pulling the trigger, pause. Think about your own inbox and everything you are expected to read or want to read every day. Now think of where the proposed newsletter would sit on your list of things to peruse. If you, as a chief executive, won’t read your own newsletter with interest, how could you expect other audiences to do so?

If you answered yes to these questions and are ready to start your newsletter, let’s talk!

 

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