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SMPS Emerging Trends in Technology Event

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Technology has advanced at a dizzying rate over the last decade and it shows no sign of slowing that pace. Feats that we could only imagine 20 years ago are a reality today thanks to tech like virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). Science fiction movies have been using holograms and mixed reality for years and now those technologies are upon us. The Society for Marketing Professional Services’ technology event, Emerging Technologies in the A/E/C Industry, is a testament to that fact. We learned some really interesting things at this comprehensive presentation and panel discussion from some of Tampa Bay’s leading techies and then we learned how these technologies are being applied to the architecture, engineering, and construction industries.

From Cool Game to Business Application

Just a few years ago, virtual reality goggles and holo-glasses were fun, experimental gadgets that offered games, travel experiences, and trips to outer space without leaving the comfort of your living room. Soon after these gadgets became more mainstream, many industries, with the help of tech-savvy staff and forward-thinking executives, started seeing the real-world business applications of this technology. In the A/E/C/ industries, the applications are vast – and important. Imagine being able to do walk-throughs of a new building with the use of virtual reality, before the contractors even start working on the foundation. Contractors, architects and engineers can communicate about the nuances of a space before construction begins. This is a huge step for eliminating costly errors and miscommunication. Virtual reality is a project manager’s dream come true.

Use Case – Atlanta Falcons

When the Atlanta Falcons decided to build their new stadium, they hired our friends at HD Interactive to create a virtual reality simulation of the stadium experience from all perspectives, including the various seating levels, the 50-yard line, and the end zones. HD Interactive rendered the simulation using the architectural and engineering plans and created an application that allowed the owners and investors to do a virtual walk-through of the stadium. They inspected the experience from a multitude of angles and discovered that the giant television screens were placed at an angle that was extremely uncomfortable to look at. They were up too high so extended viewing caused the viewer to have neck pain. As a result of this discovery, the team changed the plans and placed the screens at a level that was more comfortable to view. Having the ability to change the plans before they began construction saved a significant amount of money and time added to the project timeline.

Many industries are applying virtual reality and augmented reality. If you had the option, how would you apply this technology in your business?

 

 

 

 

 

Proposals – Advice from the Selection Committee

proposal-tips-website-heroRecently, Pinstripe Marketing attended a webinar hosted by the Society of Marketing Professionals (SMPS) Tampa Bay called “Secrets of the Selection Process,” by Gary Coover. The course was designed to enlighten us about creating a proposal as well as presenting the proposal to the selection committee, and we came away with a few great tips that we thought we would share.

  • Ask yourself if it’s a good fit for you. If it’s not, why waste the time and money?
  • Make it about the client, their problems, their pain points. It’s NOT about you, so be brief and to the point when you’re talking about your company.
  • Dress similarly to your audience. I.e. if you’re in Texas, do your research, they may be wearing cowboy boots and a hat. Don’t be inauthentic and go overboard so you look like you’re in a costume, but in this case, you could wear a western style shirt to the meeting instead of suit and tie. If you’re in Hawaii, don’t be afraid to don a Hawaiian shirt in lieu of your starched shirt if that’s the client’s style. Be subtle and respectful, but show that you are aware of their culture and are willing to assimilate.
  • Include only the most relevant information, don’t stuff the proposal full of useless information – long, hefty proposals work against you.
  • The RFP doesn’t tell the whole story, so make sure to get ahead of it. If the RFP is the first time you’ve seen or heard anything about the project, it may be too late.
  • Know everything about the project and the client.
  • Call the number on the RFP to ask questions – if you don’t have any, think harder.
  • Make the information in your proposal jump off the page. The committee has a lot of proposals to review and they don’t want to spend weeks or even days in the process, so they will be skimming and cutting frequently. If the info and graphics in your proposal stand out, you have a better chance of making it to the final cut.
  • Go above and beyond – if you really want the project and you know you stand a chance, go the extra mile and make a mockup or rendering for the specific project. Show them how you would solve their problem.
  • Bring your doers – the client doesn’t want to just see the president and vice president of the company. They want to meet the team that will be doing the work. Bring any willing team members and key players to the meeting to show your team’s solidarity. However, no more than five people should be in the room, and you don’t want your team to outnumber the selection committee, so do your homework.
  • Simplify it!
  • Bring extras, backups, anticipate all problems, check everything three times
  • Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse! Preferably in front of a committee of your own to get feedback and critique.
  • If you don’t get the work, request a debriefing so you know where you can improve next time.

Many of these tips seem obvious, but cannot be repeated enough times. Others are not so obvious and may provide you with the small, unique edge you need to win against a close competitor. Remember that the selection committee members are people too and use the power of empathy to imagine their job of reading through potentially hundreds of proposals (which, let’s face it, can be rather dull), and decide which company is best for the project. That’s a tough job, so go easy on them. Think about what you would like to see if you were in their position.

Check out some of our other articles for more tips on relationship building and business development.

Pinstripe Marketing Project Manager Nikki Devereux Named Director of Communications for Society of Marketing Professional Services (SMPS)

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St. Petersburg, Fla. – (September 14, 2016) – Pinstripe Marketing project manager, Nikki Devereux, has joined the Board of Directors as Director of Communications for the Society of Marketing Professional Services (SMPS) Tampa Bay. Her role will include working with the board to promote and plan educational events and networking events, as well as promote the overall organization through marketing and communications strategy.

“The new board has already made great strides in working together and the previous board members have helped make the transition smooth,” said Devereux after the Strategic Planning meeting. “We have a lot of great ideas and creativity happening during our meetings, so this is an exciting time for us.”

SMPS provides members in architecture, engineering and construction industries with opportunities for education, networking and career development. The organization’s work with and for these industries aligns perfectly with Pinstripe Marketing’s mission to provide a full suite of marketing services to professional services organizations.

Devereux brings a variety of skills to the table, including photography, videography, content writing, and public relations knowledge, which she will be putting to use during her tenure at SMPS Tampa Bay as Director of Communications. 

About Pinstripe Marketing

Pinstripe Marketing, Inc. is a full-service advertising, marketing and communications agency specializing in service-based organizations including law, healthcare, education, architecture, construction, engineering, non-profits and more. Services include marketing plan development and implementation, advertising, collateral design, event planning, media buying, web design, video production and public relations. For details about Pinstripe, please visit www.pinstripemarketing.com.

About SMPS Tampa Bay

The Society for Marketing Professional Services (SMPS) Tampa Bay is the only organization in the Tampa Bay area devoted to providing members in professional services industries with opportunities for education, networking with other A/E/C professionals, and career development. By organizing presentations, panel discussions, socials, coffee meet-ups, and educational webinars, SMPS Tampa Bay hopes to serve the best interests of its members. Learn more at www.smpstampabay.com.