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Everything I Know About Marketing, I Learned from Wonder Woman

WonderWomanMarketingIntro_news

It’s no secret that I have been a fan of Wonder Woman since an early age. And, for good reason. She symbolizes the strength and intelligence every woman possesses. My personal philosophy of Wonder Woman marketing goes into every project I’m a part of, every meeting I attend and every opportunity that comes my way.

More than a Super Hero

The Wonder Woman movie captivated audiences across the globe. It almost reached the billion-dollar mark at the box office. Not to mention, the comic book series has changed much since World War II, yet continues to be published for many adoring fans. Why? Because Wonder Woman had timeless qualities that women (and men) of all eras can admire: god-like strength and intellect, and a benevolent nature.

A Positive Symbol for Everyone!

Over the years, I’ve collected Wonder Woman themed goodies, like the wall mural with Diana making funny faces or the latest Pop! Comics figurine.

wonder woman photobooth

My friends have also given me some of the best gifts that depict her in fun and quirky ways I think everyone can relate with. They are all displayed prominently in my office. I can still look upon each gift and get inspired to do my best for my friends and clients. It makes me feel good to see Wonder Woman is also inspiring another generation of young women stepping forward to take on the world with confident intelligence.

More to Come

Did you know that Wonder Woman also had great powers of persuasion? She used her intuition and intellect, as much as her Lasso of Truth, to convince people that the truth was the best option. This got me thinking about how marketing has a lot in common with Wonder Woman’s super powers and gadgets. Over the next few months, look for our articles on how Pinstripe is inspired by Wonder Woman and hopefully she’ll inspire you to be a Wonder Woman in your own work, too.

 

Passion – The Road to Success

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We expect to see passion in entrepreneurs, small business owners, and freelancers – these people are following their dreams to own their own business doing what they love most. Passion is what drives them morning, noon, and night to work hard, talk about their business often, and go out of their way to make their business successful. But what if we saw passion in employees of larger companies and even enterprise corporations?

The Brand Ambassador

We recently scheduled a series of photo shoots to begin building a media library for one of our larger clients – a Fortune 500 behemoth with locations in Tampa, throughout the U.S., Canada, and Europe. At each location there has been one thing that we’ve noticed – every person we’ve encountered has been incredibly helpful, knowledgeable about their company, and passionate. They not only helped us by guiding us through their processes, explaining many of the inner workings of their organization so we gain a better understanding of what images and video we need to create and informing us of shots we may have never realized we needed, but they did it with a visible pride. Their hospitality has been incredible – we expected to be greeted and then left to our own devices, but what we received from each person who assisted us was a personal tour guide and brand ambassador. We are impressed.

Passion – A Part of Company Culture

What we began to notice is that each person in this company exceeded our expectations – in essence, they were acting like business owners rather than employees by demonstrating the same passion an entrepreneur would. This is something that we have always believed in theory, but never has it been so thoroughly supported by direct empirical evidence. What it boils down to is employee empowerment. Empowering your employees instills in them the same passion for the business as the business owner, and it is a direct result of the culture that you create within your organization.

How to Instill Passion in Company Culture

There are many ways to create a culture of passion and ownership. Here are just a few:

  • Transparency. Give people visibility into the decision-making process
  • Collaboration. Provide spaces that facilitate collaboration and make sure managers are collaborative with their employees
  • Autonomy. Autonomy is an important part of ownership – make sure people have autonomy in as many aspects of their work and even their schedule as possible
  • Community. Establish a tight-knit community within your organization, bringing people together to get to know each other, make them feel at home, make sure that executives mingle often with the rest of the organization’s employees, make sure people have fun in addition to working hard
  • Training and education. Offer thorough education about the industry, organization, its history, clients, etc, and commit to updating that education frequently. Offer courses so employees have opportunities to learn more about their jobs and build upon their job skills and offer resources for further education
  • Hiring. If you keep in mind company culture during the hiring process, you will ensure to bring on employees that share a passion for your business, will thrive in your company, and take advantage of the education and training that you offer
  • Loyalty. Be loyal to your employees – they will reward you with the same

These are just a few ways to introduce people and programs that will create a culture of passion. They are easily applicable to smaller organizations, but employing them on a larger scale may prove more difficult. We know it is possible and have seen it in action, but it requires company-wide participation. It won’t be successful if everyone is not on board.

Here are a few articles that offer advice on creating a positive culture within your organization:

3 Ways I Created a Culture of Passion

8 Rules Creating Passionate Work Culture

Building a Culture of Passion and Excellence

What methods do you employ to build a company culture of ownership and passion?

Volunteering Builds New Skills

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For many years, Pinstripe has been committed to causes that are close to our hearts. Our own personal and professional growth can be tied directly to the many organizations that provide valuable services for our community. And, because of this, we have gained so much.

Leadership

Each opportunity with a nonprofit organization places us in a new environment. These organizations are short on resources, so you have to really know how to get the most from people you know, especially within your business network. Getting others involved in a nonprofit shows leadership and drive.

It’s through volunteering that you may get the opportunity to lead others, especially when there are limited opportunities in the office. Volunteering has taught us new leadership skills, such as:

  • Maximizing a limited amount of resources
  • Application of expertise in new ways
  • Using innovative ways to reach people
  • Leading a group of individuals with one common goal

More importantly, the relationships you build while volunteering can last a lifetime. These relationships will expand your personal and professional network, helping you to realize your goals.

Soft Skills

For recent graduates, soft skills have become more prized than technical knowledge. Business owners can teach them how to perform their job, but not how to interact well with others. If you have these skills, then practicing them is just as important as developing them. Volunteering is a good way to both learn and continue to practice soft skills.

What are soft skills? They include the following:

  • Communication skills
  • Time management
  • Problem-solving
  • Creativity
  • Being a good team player
  • Empathy and compassion

Developing these soft skills can have a big impact on your career. For millennials, this type of experience can boost credibility and give them the edge in a tight marketplace. Over time, volunteering teaches how perseverance and tenacity can overcome roadblocks and changes in the economic landscape.

Personal and Professional Growth

With all of the changes in technology and the way we do business, we need to be able to react swiftly and with confidence. We can vouch for the fact that volunteering helps us face new challenges without fear. Volunteering is as much about personal growth as it is about helping others. It allows us to engage with people in our community, listen to them and try to help. This gives us a deeper understanding of what the community needs and also experience in addressing those needs. Volunteering may start small, but who knows, over time this can change to even bigger roles. That’s up to you and how far you want to take it.

Google’s Reach For Data

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Data Harvesting: Before the internet, data collection was primarily census information and zip codes. Of course, there was more to it, but it was far less precise. Today, Google, Facebook and Microsoft (Bing) trade services to consumers for information about them—keeping an ongoing record of their activity—eventually they know what you look like and exactly where you are. For businesses this is a big deal, but more about that later.

It’s no surprise that these companies and a whole host of others are gathering information about you with every click on your phone and every stop you make while running errands. Yes, that’s right. If your phone has Google’s Android on it then they know through GPS data where you’ve been. This link shows you how it can be turned off, but I’m all for keeping it on. As a matter of fact, I’m a Level 5 Google Local Guide. They show where I’ve been during the week and I review those businesses, because I believe that good businesses should be rewarded with good reviews.

With GPS data being a major component of Google’s data harvesting, some of the other types of data are: Gmail (every email and the content inside it), search history, bookmarks, user profile, apps downloaded, YouTube history, friends, connections, family and many others. The amount of data they store about one person can be more than 5GB of data. That’s millions of Word documents!

Of course, you’ve agreed to all of this and so have billions of people and organizations. Some have opted out and others have strict privacy settings, but, in all, Google has a pretty good idea of who you are, especially as a consumer. And they had better because that’s how they make money.

What’s the Payoff for Access?

We’ve done lots of articles on target marketing and how important it is for ROI. This is why Google AdWords is the best at targeted marketing strategies. They have the biggest reach with nearly 66 percent of total search volume worldwide and the most data. Google’s pay-per-click helps businesses find new customers – they are years ahead of anyone else, because advertisers pay only for direct connections with potential customers.

Facebook and many others are still charging for impressions, or how many people may have seen the ad, which is great for brand awareness, but doesn’t hit the bullseye. With Google, advertisers may get impressions, but only pay for click-through rates. All of this data is still collected and offered to the customer.

When it comes to Facebook, their checkered past of exaggerated ad data makes us cautious of an enthusiastic endorsement. Also, Google and Facebook are very different in the way they determine ads served. Facebook bases ad choices on consumers’ chosen interests on their profile, while Google collects organic data as the consumer moves throughout their daily routine.

Are There Really Any Alternatives?

Yes, there are a few and you should give them a try, particularly if Google is too expensive or your keywords have multiple meanings. For starters, there’s Bing, also a pay-per-click service that has a great track record and over 150 million unique users. Plus, they boast a captivated market share with an audience that is older and spends 25 percent more money online than other users. In most cases, Bing is cheaper for advertisers than Google because they don’t have the sizable reach.

Amazon and BuySellAds are different in that they sell awareness with high click-through rates. Amazon is best for retailers and BuySellAds works great for entering new markets. There are many choices and finding the one that’s right for you can be a difficult decision. Shoot us an email and we can walk you through the options.

Michael Premo
Content Strategist
Pinstripe Marketing

Pinstripe Book Shelf: Self-Made by Nely Galan

self made nely galan inspiration_news

Don’t Buy Shoes, Buy Buildings: Lessons from Self-Made by Nely Galan.  Back in October of 2017, the Pinstripe team attended the Women’s Conference of Florida (read the recap here.) One of the most memorable presentations of the conference was the very first one – Nely Galan. This vibrant, exciting woman gave us energy, confidence, and drive. We walked out of that room feeling empowered! She’s one of those people with an infectious energy – she makes you want to take your day by storm. Her parting gift to the entire audience – a copy of her book, “Self-Made: Becoming Empowered, Self-Reliant, and Rich in Every Way.” Needless to say, after that presentation, we couldn’t wait to read it.

Self-Made – The Woman

Nely Galan, daughter of hard-working immigrant parents, built her career on engendered hard work, positivity, and by learning from her mistakes every step of the way. She gave herself solid role models and was goal-oriented; she was constantly setting her goals and asking herself the question, “will this get me closer to my goal?” about every move she made. Sometimes she took a step forward through her decisions, and sometimes a step backward, but she always kept her eye on the target. She also continued to update her goals to keep up with her own growth – here is one important lesson from Nely: check in with your goals often – you may find that they change over time and as you grow.

Self-Made – The Book

Her book is essentially an expanded version of her presentation – each chapter contains a lesson or a self-realization goal and a series of stories from her own life explaining how she achieved or learned the lesson. Many of the chapters also feature stories about other women succeeding using similar techniques or approaches. Overall, the book is just like Nely, energetic and full of positivity.

A few lessons:

  • Channel a role model (even if you’ve never met them) – in tough situations, ask yourself, “what would Michelle Obama do?”
  • Buy buildings, not shoes – Nely is all about being smart with your money, in particular investing in real estate
  • Failures are lessons – don’t be afraid to fail
  • No matter where you come from or what your background, you can become a powerful, self-made woman
  • Revisit your goals often
  • Don’t rely on a hero or Prince Charming to save you or support you – be self-made!
  • Money doesn’t buy happiness, but it can offer freedom

One problem with a book being like a person is that Nely has a certain presence that is charismatic, her voice is uplifting, and her energy is palpable and contagious. The book alone would not have had the same impact if we had not seen her in action. I am not usually a self-help book reader, but Galan’s presentation compelled me, irresistibly, to read this book. So powerful were her words and spirit that even a skeptic was led to spend precious reading time on a genre outside of my preference. I was not disappointed, but not astounded either.

To sum up this review – if you like self-help books and need a boost of positivity and energy, I recommend reading this book. If you can see Nely Galan presenting in person to supplement the book, even better. There are no Earth-shattering secrets, no profound lessons in this book. It is refreshing and fun to read, but it can get repetitive and reinforces many things we likely already apply to our daily lives – work hard, work smart, have confidence in yourself, and spend/invest wisely.