Categories

Recent Posts

Zodiac Marketer: Leo

Our next zodiac sign is Leo: birthdays between July 23 – August 22.

Leo is a fire sign with the strengths: generous, cheerful and humorous. They are also creative and passionate, but we’ve had quite a few zodiac signs with these traits, so we decided to go with some we haven’t done before. Leo’s weaknesses are arrogance and self-centeredness. We’ll explore some of the obvious, and not so obvious reasons, that you should embrace the positive and avoid those negative behaviors.

 

Generosity in Marketing

Generosity is definitely something to have in abundance for your business and marketing campaigns. In fact, some forms of generosity are great marketing tactics!

There are many ways to be generous from a business perspective. As a business owner, sometimes you have to be generous to your customers or clients. Generosity could be a free coffee giveaway or a plate of cookies waiting at the door. You could support a charity once a month by donating 10% of sales.

Have you considered offering a membership with perks or recurring visitor discount? This can mean giving them discounts, offering coupons or other promotions. After all, these are the people who support your business, so why not reward them with incentives.

Think about the generosity you receive from the businesses you frequent. What can you do that is similar to say “thank you” to your clientele?

 

Cheerfulness in Marketing

Being cheerful and positive is always putting your best foot forward. Do this naturally and try not to fake it. People want to be around cheerful people. They are uplifting, have a positive outlook on life, and thus a positive outlook on many things.

In one of our previous Zodiac Marketer articles, we talked about avoiding moodiness by leaving all your bad day blues at the door, particularly when meeting with clients. What better way to approach a potential client than with a genuine smile and greeting.

This applies to customer service as well. Would you rather buy something from a grumpy, negative person? Making people feel comfortable and cared for is a large part of the customer service recipe. Put yourself in your clients’ shoes and think about how would you want to be treated.

 

Humor in Marketing

Who doesn’t enjoy someone with a good sense of humor? As long as the theme is appropriate and not offensive, go ahead and toss out those quippy one-liners to get the board room roaring with laughter (or at least a good chuckle).

Don’t force it! Again, it’s important to be natural here. There is nothing more painful than a terrible or inappropriate joke that falls flat. If it’s a meeting with a prospect, you will not be getting a call back and you certainly won’t win the business.

In your marketing campaigns, humor is a welcome and wonderful thing, but be careful not to overdo it or make anyone uncomfortable. Your marketing and advertising team should be pros at this and have no problem discerning the good humorous copy and design from the bad.

 

Avoid: Arrogance in Marketing

There is the obvious arrogant behavior that no one likes to be around. Also, be aware of some more subtle behavior that could be misconstrued as arrogance (particularly in marketing campaigns).

Let’s assume that we are all striving to be the best at what we do and make. You truly believe your product or service is better than anyone else’s and you want to shout it out to the world. Be wary of stating it in a way that can come off as arrogant, such as bashing your competition, dismissing negative feedback from customers (we wrote an entire article on negative feedback!), flipping the bird to naysayers, and all manner of similar bad behavior that is rude and offensive.

This goes for your employees too! They are brand ambassadors and should conduct themselves as responsible stewards of the brand at all times.

 

Avoid: Being Self-Centered in Marketing

Being self-centered as an individual is already bad enough. Being self-centered as a business can be downright fatal to your brand. Think about it this way. We live in a diverse world with people from a mosaic of backgrounds, preferences, and needs. It is possible that your target audience is quite specific, therefore you are trying to appeal to a certain demographic of people. Don’t let this be the catalyst for a narrow vision in your marketing campaigns.

In other words, think outside of yourself and your target audience, by always putting yourself in the shoes of other potential audiences who may not be your particular target. Are you alienating or offending them? Are your campaigns inclusive enough to perhaps draw in a new client base? If you can step outside your own bubble and take a bird’s eye view of your marketing campaign, you may find that a self-centered approach that was born inside a vacuum is actually harming your efforts.

Being more inclusive and thoughtful can create a richer business environment with more prospects for you, and at the very least, you will be in harmony with the diverse community in which we live.

Have you ever experienced any of the above traits in your marketing campaigns or business? We’d love to hear your stories!

Ginger Reichl Appointed National Student Advertising Competition Chair for the 4th District American Advertising Federation

Pinstripe Marketing is pleased to announce that its president, Ginger Reichl, has been appointed 2019-20 Chairperson of the National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) for the Fourth District American Advertising Federation.

Each year, a sponsor provides more than 2,000 college students with a real-world case study and an outline overviewing its product and their current advertising plan. Students must learn about their product and research the brand’s competition in order to develop a new campaign plan for the company. The college chapter members then develop a comprehensive plans book and an accompanying 20-minute presentation. This new campaign strategy is then “pitched” by each team to a line of judges. The judging panel is comprised of professionals from the communications industry. Students from AAF college chapters from Florida and the Caribbean will compete in April 2020 and the winner will go on to compete in a semi-final round where the top eight compete at ADMERICA, the AAF national conference in June.

Ginger was a member of Florida State University’s NSAC team during her senior year in 1993 and says it was one of the best experiences of her college career. She later served as Fourth District NSAC Chair for several years prior to taking a hiatus from board service.

“I have a big soft spot for advertising education and the NSAC,” said Reichl. “Working with the AAF, district leadership, and the team advisors is always rewarding, but seeing the student’s work always leaves me energized and inspired. These are the best of the best in the next generation of advertising professionals.”

The 2018 NSAC sponsor is Adobe.

Zodiac Marketer: Cancer

cancer zodiac marketer_featured

Our next zodiac sign is Cancer: birthdays between June 21 – July 22.

Cancer is a water sign with the following strengths: loyalty, tenacity, and persuasiveness. Perfect traits for a strong marketer to possess. Cancer’s weaknesses can put a wrench in any marketing or business project. Being moody, pessimistic, and insecure are surefire ways to halt progress. In the following paragraphs we discuss how Cancer’s strengths and weaknesses apply to marketing.

Loyalty in Marketing

When we think of loyalty, we often think of clients’ loyalty to our brand. But, think about it; if you want someone to be loyal to you, shouldn’t you also be loyal to them? Loyalty to your clients can appear in many different ways. One of the most crucial is to always ask yourself if the product or service you provide is the best for your clients’ businesses. For example, we always look at our work with our clients not as isolated projects, but from the larger perspective. Is this one marketing project going to have the greatest impact on your goals, or is there another approach that will use your budget more effectively? We treat our clients’ businesses as if they were our own, which helps us make recommendations and decisions that are best for their business, not just ours.

Tenacity in Marketing

Tenacity is a useful trait to possess in creative endeavors, particularly marketing. Tenacity can mean that you back your design assertively, standing up and defending your work and its effectiveness. Tenacity can mean working long hours to meet a creative deadline or a website launch. Tenacity is constant learning in your field so that you can give your clients the best product or service possible. Tenacity is experimenting with new techniques to stay on the cutting edge of your field.

Persuasiveness in Marketing

This is a no brainer! Persuasiveness is the core of advertising and marketing. Put simply, when you market a product or service, you are persuading your audience that you are the best fit for their needs. Everything else follows from that.

Avoid Moodiness in Marketing

Moodiness should be left at home, no matter what. Let’s say we have a proposal presentation to the top three executives of a large prospect. One of us didn’t get much sleep and the other didn’t have her morning coffee. Yet another member of our team had a disagreement with her husband the night before. There are a lot of life issues that could put you in a bad mood, and they probably happen to most people on a daily basis. The point here is to leave all of that at the door, whatever it takes. Think of a funny story that lightens your mood, tell a joke, or repeat your personal mantra. If you don’t already have a bad mood eraser, consider adopting one. Don’t let a bad mood lose you prospects and even clients! No one wants to work with a person whose moods are unpredictable, right? I sure don’t. It halts productivity and can be passed on to other people. Pass on positivity instead.

Avoid Insecurity in Marketing

One thing we can’t be is insecure when we’re presenting a logo design or a website design to a client. In order for them to feel good about approving a design, they need to sense our confidence. And if we’re not confident about our design, we shouldn’t be presenting it. Having confidence starts with having a good product. If you feel even a little bit of doubt in your product or customer experience, consider an audit of your products and services to make sure you are offering the best possible experience. Offering the best possible product can eliminate your insecurity and will launch your marketing campaign to a whole new level. When you have confidence in your product, marketing becomes easy.

Have you ever experienced any of the above positive and/or negative traits in your marketing campaigns? We’d love to hear your story!

Digital Marketing – What’s Your Strategy?

digital marketing strategy

Marketing has changed a lot over the years and I’ve been fortunate enough to see how it has taken shape. In the past, we used broadcast and print marketing to reach out to consumers and businesses. Back then, we didn’t call it traditional marketing. We just called it marketing.

Today, the digital universe has not only changed the way we reach out to people but it’s also changed what we say. Brand messaging is the biggest change that I’ve seen. It matters to your clients and customers. It also matters to the general public. Don’t believe me? Take a look at the recent public relations nightmares. So, having a strategic plan to deliver your message throughout the digital-verse is just as important as it was in the past.

Digital Resembles Traditional

Digital marketing has some basic concepts in common with traditional marketing. The goal of a traditional marketing campaign was to cover as many bases possible—to capture as much attention while staying within budget. A well-rounded campaign focused on primary and secondary activities.

Primary activities delivered the entire message. These had more space or time for content that gave all the necessary details. Typically, primary activities were print-based and some broadcast media, such as infomercials and infotainment.

Secondary activities were used to keep brand names front-of-mind for consumers. This is a broad category that includes things like billboards and vinyl-wrapped busses. The goal of secondary activities was to complement marketing campaigns through increasing brand recognition.

Digital Marketing: A Comprehensive Mix

Everyone, regardless of age, is now online. The digital world is part our every day lives. Television is on smartphones. Radio stations stream through wireless speakers. Voice-controlled personal assistants sit in our living room and robots roam our houses. Marketers can capitalize on these changes by investigating how new and unique platforms within the digital-verse can deliver their message.

It’s time to be more strategic about your digital presence. You really need to have all things digital in play. Just like traditional methods, we need to have a good mix of primary and secondary sources for people to find your business.

More Than Just a Website – Primary

Websites are no longer digital brochures. Your home page has become your storefront—your front lobby. It’s where potential and repeat customers enter your business. And it has to do so much more than ever before.

Your website has to be a primary source of information. Every visitor should have all of their questions answered before leaving it. If not, they should be able to ask and get a quick response.

Added to this is the fact that your website depends upon two major criteria: search engine optimization (SEO) and mobile responsive design. Without these, your website won’t be as easily found by Google. SEO requires strategic organic search optimization through original content, such as videos, articles and blogs. These need to capture viewers’ attention, be informative, and need to be updated frequently or else Google will send you to the end of the list.

Social Media – Primary

The world of social media is always changing, always in flux, but one thing is for certain, it’s not going away. Your social media presence has to be a primary source of information. It also has to create an emotional connection with your viewers. This is just as true for B2B as it is for B2C marketing.

The bio pages on any social media site can inform your visitors about what you do and where you’re located. Frequent posts with pictures and videos show your business in action. Informative articles, white papers, and video content about your business’ expertise should also be shared frequently on social media. Remain positive in this space. Business social media pages are not a political platform and you will see your audience diminish drastically if you use them in this way. All of these guidelines will also help your efforts with public relations.

Google My Business – Primary

When Google knows more about your business, your visibility will increase. This means more traffic to your site and social channels. That’s what Google My Business does. It puts you on the map, allows online reviews, and provides primary sources of information. Here are some handy statistics about Google My Business:

Pay-Per-Click (PPC) – Secondary

In some ways, paid search has taken the place of broadcast media’s quick ad spots. But it’s so much different than blasting your message to everyone listening. As a secondary source, it resides in the middle of your sales funnel and provides measurable and trackable data. This leads to increased targeting and more appealing messages.

Paid search is a great way to target new audiences with relevant content. It drives more people to where you want them to go. We regard PPC as an important activity for any digital marketing campaign.

Content – Secondary

Your digital marketing campaign needs flawless content. This ranges from videos to podcasts to blog posts and each one has to differentiate you from everyone else. The best advice we can offer about content is to be authentic and be genuine. Show off your best and people will notice.

Content puts your expertise on display. It shows how your company is unique, and what your company culture is like. Plus, frequent updates of content keep your website active and relevant for search engines.

Link Building – Secondary

Your website really can’t rank well if it doesn’t have link building. This goes even further than someone linking to one of your blog posts. It’s about building partnerships, getting mentions in the press, appearing in videos and on podcasts, and building influencer relationships. Link building should also be part of your public relations strategy.

We Help with the Specifics

A solid digital marketing strategy can improve your visibility, which is a pretty big deal these days. But it also tells the story about your company. Knowing these general concepts is the first step in a bold digital presence. There is so much more to learn about messaging in the digital space, as well as which platforms work best.

Pinstripe has helped local and nationally-based businesses with every aspect of their digital marketing. We specialize in discovering our clients’ personal traits—their corporate character—and putting them on display. Our creative team consists of listeners and discoverers that have an innate ability to help you achieve your vision. Contact us to tell us more about your company and your marketing goals.

Want Happy Clients? Get to Know Them

client_research_marketing_featured

Your clients are the people that fund your bankroll. You have to know who they are and how they think if you want to tailor your business to them. Not only can this give you insight on where to spend your advertising dollars, but knowing your clients will also help you be more accessible to them, and in an age when time is in short supply, convenience is key. Here, we’ll look at a few ways you can better understand the people who make your business a success.

Meet the competition first

Before you compile a client profile, do some recon on the competition. Choose two or three businesses that offer the same products or services. Your competitive analysis can include marketing, products, pricing, and personnel. SquareUp also suggests looking at secondary and tertiary competitors. Your findings can give you insight into areas where you may need to increase attention, such as online interactions, or ideas on supplemental services your clients want.

Client profiling

Defining your client base means paying close attention to their personal interests, habits, and priorities.

First, determine where they are. You’ll want to know specifics so that you can understand their daily, weekly, and monthly patterns. For example, knowing your clients spend time reading news blogs and drinking coffee isn’t enough — refine this information to include the particular news blogs they read and what coffee shops they frequent.

Another important aspect of your clients that you should know is how they get information about your offerings. Do they use Google? Come in off the street? Follow their favorite businesses on social media? You should meet them where they seek you out. Evaluate your website to ensure you’re visible, add eye-catching banners or displays to your front entrance, or create targeted social media and Google ads. Wordstream notes that “snappy, memorable taglines” are great ways to grab attention online.

One of the most crucial pieces of the profile will be your clients’ challenges. Provide services that solve their problems and they’ll come back again and again. Like everyone else, your patrons are short on time and anything that gives it back and takes away frustrations is valuable. Duct Tape Marketing asserts that one place to look when trying to determine common problems is your reviews. You might notice a theme, such as “this company did the work quickly…” or “Their designs were super creative and their team was very responsive…” You can use this data to ascertain what it is they want and why.

Finally, determine their budget. People who shop at Walmart and buy store-brand water are likely more money-conscious than those who buy their necessities at the mall and drink Perrier. Likewise, larger companies will have a larger budget for building renovations or legal council, while smaller companies will look for more affordable alternatives. This insight can help you compile a listing of products and services that appeal to each potential client, which will keep them from scouring the competition.

The bottom line: do your research, and do it well. Failure to be thorough can lead to a marketing disaster and hordes of dissatisfied customers (remember New Coke?). Your clients know what they want, and it’s up to you to give it to them. The only way to do this is to understand them and then cater to and anticipate their needs.

Article by Marissa Perez of BusinessPOP.